Explain the process of carbon 14 dating

So by measuring carbon 14 levels in an organism that died long ago, researchers can figure out when it died.The procedure of radiocarbon dating can be used for remains that are up to 50,000 years old.Animals and plants have a known proportion of Carbon-14 (a radioisotope of Carbon) in their tissues.When they die they stop taking Carbon in, then the amount of Carbon-14 goes down at a known rate (Carbon-14 has a half-life of 5700 years).Baumgardner and the RATE team are to be commended for tackling the subject, but their “intrinsic radiocarbon” explanation does not work.The previously published radiocarbon AMS measurements can generally be explained by contamination, mostly due to sample chemistry.

Animal fossils first appear in rocks dating back about 1 billion years.

A form of radiometric dating used to determine the age of organic remains in ancient objects, such as archaeological specimens, on the basis of the half-life of carbon-14 and a comparison between the ratio of carbon-12 to carbon-14 in a sample of the remains to the known ratio in living organisms. A technique for measuring the age of organic remains based on the rate of decay of carbon 14.

The carbon 14 present in an organism at the time of its death decays at a steady rate, and so the age of the remains can be calculated from the amount of carbon 14 that is left. The cells of all living things contain carbon atoms that they take in from their environment.

The RATE coal samples were probably contaminated in situ.

RATE’s processed diamond samples were probably contaminated in the sample chemistry.

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